Newspaper headlines: Obese cookery classes and green belt threat



Image copyright
Daily Telegraph

Image caption

The Royal Navy can only send a quarter of its warships to sea due to spending cuts, the Telegraph claims. On its front page it says the cuts have left the armed forces “struggling to protect Britain’s citizens”. It claims 13 of the navy’s frigates and destroyers cannot be deployed due to lack of manpower.

Image copyright
Mirror Newspapers

Image caption

The Mirror leads with the latest pay dispute between NHS staff and the government, after worker’s union Unison demanded a 3.9% pay rise “to end the crippling effect of the pay cap”. It comes as the government agreed to end the 1% pay cap for police and prison officers.

Image copyright
GMG

Image caption

The Guardian’s front page also reflects news that Unison has demanded a pay rise for NHS workers. The paper adds that the union wants an extra £800 per staff member to make up for lost earnings during seven years of austerity. The pay rise for one million health workers would amount to £3bn, the paper claims.

Image copyright
Financial Times

Image caption

The Financial Times suggests that the Bank of England “is poised to raise interest rates” at the November meeting of the Monetary Policy Committee. The paper says that the UK’s central bank could raise interest rates for the first time in a decade. Although the bank chose to keep rates at 0.25%, currency markets were boosted by the speculation.

Image copyright
News UK

Image caption

GPs are being advised to send nearly two million overweight people in the UK to cooking and exercise classes at £435-a-head, The Times reports. New guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) says the programme, which will cost billions, will pay for itself within 14 years by preventing thousands cases of diabetes.

Image copyright
DMG Media

Image caption

The Daily Mail claims “well-off” parts of the country could face tens of thousands of new homes under government plans to tackle the UK’s housing crisis. Communities Secretary Sajid Javid said many areas would have to accept a number of houses “well beyond” previously estimated figures. It comes as the minister said 266,000 need to be built over the next decade, rather than previous estimates of 200,000.

Image copyright
Johnston Press

Image caption

The i leads on the latest from the Grenfell Tower public inquiry on Thursday. It says that survivors of the fire, which killed 80 people in the North Kensington tower block, feel chairman Sir Martin Moore-Bick was “turning his back on them”. It comes as the judge refused to appoint a survivor to the panel, claiming it would affect the impartiality of the inquiry.

Image copyright
News UK

Image caption

A Financial Times journalist was “dragged to his death” by a crocodile while in a beauty spot in Sri Lanka, The Sun claims. The paper says 24-year-old Paul McClean died on holiday. A Foreign and Commonwealth Office spokesperson said it was “assisting the family of a man who has been reported missing in Sri Lanka”.

Image copyright
Express Newspapers

Image caption

People who are at a “healthy weight” are up-to 41% less likely to develop high blood pressure, according to research published in the Daily Express. The research, from the University of Alabama, claims that shedding pounds is more important in lowering blood pressure than giving up smoking or drinking.

Nearly two million people could soon find themselves being sent to free cookery classes, The Times claims. The initiative, proposed by the health body Nice, would also include personal trainers, activity regimes and healthy recipes, with the purpose of combating obesity. The Daily Telegraph expects everyone over 40 to be offered diabetes tests. And The Sun covers the story with a picture of a generous waistline spilling over its restraining belt with the headline, “chubby checkers”.

Get news from the BBC in your inbox, each weekday morning

The Daily Mirror says the “most shocking” thing about the pay demand made by a million NHS workers is its “modesty”. The paper argues that meeting it would only maintain, and not improve, the living standards of staff. But a think-tank expert tells The Guardian that, while the pay claim is understandable, the NHS just isn’t funded at a level that would make it affordable.

A report on the death of a promising young journalist seized by a crocodile in Sri Lanka is the main story in The Sun. The paper says Paul McClean had been on a dream holiday when horror struck. The Daily Express tells how he’d wandered off from friends on a surfing beach when the crocodile dragged him into a lagoon.

Image copyright
AFP

The opening statement by the judge in charge of the Grenfell tower inquiry is described by The Telegraph as “sober and well-balanced”. It believes Sir Martin Moore-Bick is “the right person” to conduct the investigation, and rejects the view of some that he is “the wrong colour and class.”

Deep inequalities were exposed by the tragedy, says The Times, but the purpose of the inquiry is to come up with clear and practical recommendations that can be applied to other high rise blocks in order to make them safe. The paper advises him not to “stray too far”. And the Daily Mail thinks the absolute priority is that he does the job “as quickly as possible.”

Image copyright
Bodleian Libraries

Image caption

Reading from right to left the small dot zero is the seventh character at the bottom right of the manuscript

The Telegraph reports on a mathematical discovery made at Oxford University’s Bodleian Library. Tests have shown that an Indian manuscript, dating to the third or fourth century, contains the earliest known reference to the number zero. The text uses black dots to represent nothing.

The Mail also writes about the discovery that a perfectly chilled bottle of champagne will emit a “grey white cloud of fog” when opened. Unfortunately, as a French chemical physicist tells the paper, “it is invisible to the naked eye”.

The Daily Mirror celebrates the return home of nine-year-old Max Johnson after a successful heart transplant. The paper calls it a “wonderful moment”, but also promises to go on campaigning for a change in the law in England and Northern Ireland, so that consent is presumed to have been given for the organs of anyone who dies to be used in transplant surgery. The paper believes that’s the best way to prevent many needless deaths.

The Guardian considers the current popularity of a number of horror films, saying that the genre is captivating cinemagoers with films like the current adaptation of Stephen King’s IT.

But The Sun reports that working clowns believe their business is being hit by the big success of the movie One tells the paper its portrayal of a killer clown is putting parents off booking the performers for children’s parties.



Source link


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *